How To Craft A Story The Press Will Care About

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Okay so you’ve decided to take the leap! You are ready to take your brand to the next level and activate a press campaign. You have a popping website, your Instagram looks clean and you know that you provide an amazing product for your client.  Now, it’s time to reach out to the media and get featured!

You’ve seen a million people get featured on podcasts, magazines,etc. It can’t be that hard, right? WRONG. Public relations is all about RELATIONSHIP BUILDING, being an asset to journalists, writers, producers, etc. In order for you to be an asset/valuable resource, you have to develop a story that the press will care about.  Here’s how:

  1. Pay attention to what they write about- Just because someone writes for Essence, that doesn’t mean that they will write about YOU! Each editor/writer has their own beat/industry that they cover. Someone that is a beauty writer is not going to care about your new tech app unless it is beauty related. So before you press send on that email, be sure that you are paying attention to the writer and the stories they’ve featured in the past. Ask yourself the following questions,

Have they covered this before?

Does this seem like something that they would be interested in?

Why would it be interesting to them?

How am I positioning myself as a thought leader and asset by providing them with this story line.


2. It’s all about New News-  No one wants to continuously talk about the same old thing. After a while, it gets boring right? It’s the same thing with crafting your brand story. Sure, your competition may have just been featured for a similar product, but perhaps you have a different viewpoint. Here’s the thing, there is nothing new under the sun. It is all about how you position yourself. So for instance, if I am a makeup artist that just created a new vegan eyeshadow pallette, as I am preparing to pitch myself to the media, I am going to focus on reasons why I created my palette (for the sake of this example, let’s say I suffered from rashes using MAC/Sephora make up) and it being a timely story, (my pallette will be released Summer 2018) This will be of interest to the press because


  1. You are pitching to editors, writers who cover similar stories

  2. Your product is new/has just been released

  3. You are providing them with information that their audience needs


3. If at first you don’t succeed, try again- Let’s face it, you may not always get it right on the first try. Pitching to the press is about relationships and also trial and error. Sometimes in order to figure out what people will care about, you have to figure out what they don’t care about first. And this takes time. You may want to start with one set of outlets first ie podcasts, bloggers, etc and work your way up. This way, you have time to build upon your story, create and maximize current press opportunities and connect with bigger outlets all at the same time. Following up is key when it comes to creating rapport, getting featured in the press and establishing yourself in your industry